Lectio Resources

This past Monday, we looked at a monktastic way to read literature. So much of our daily reading is centered on gaining information quickly and with minimal effort. That’s not necessarily bad in itself since we need breaks and different levels of attention and some work should be done as efficiently as possible. But if … More Lectio Resources

How to Read Literature Like a Monk

I mentioned last Monday that I sometimes apply the monastic method of lectio divina (sacred reading) to the first few times I read a poem. Following Parker Palmer’s suggestion that students need contemplative reading practices to balance the institutional leaning toward shallow “speed reading,” Mike Ruso and Paul Corrigan developed a variant of lectio for literature that … More How to Read Literature Like a Monk

3 Reasons Why You Should Read Difficult Poems

Last time we looked at a possible way to start reading poetry. I suggested maybe choosing poems that seem more accessible, but what about the ones that get labeled inaccessible? Today we’re going to think about difficult poems and why they’re important. So you’ve got a poem in front of you. You’ve been staring at it … More 3 Reasons Why You Should Read Difficult Poems

“Felix Randal” as a Pattern for Remembering Hopkins

In the sonnet, “Felix Randal,” Gerard Manley Hopkins remembers a local Liverpool blacksmith that he had ministered to. Thanks to the work of Alfred Thomas, we even know who inspired this poem. One of Hopkins’s parishioners, A Liverpool farrier by the name of Felix Spence, died after suffering from an illness in 1880. Usually when … More “Felix Randal” as a Pattern for Remembering Hopkins