Public Scholarship Series

Partnering with colleagues from Emory, Baylor, and Harvard, I developed and launched a statement of achievement series on public scholarship. This series has resulted in a conference talk at the Engaging Open Social Scholarship gathering, and an article in the public humanities journal, Pop! Public. Open. Participatory. My favorite result of the workshop series, however, is that it broke down disciplinary and institutional barriers. A professor of social work and visiting professor of sociology are now sharing ideas about pedagogy, and digital humanists from USD and ECDS are now in contact with one another.

Sequence Description

Want to engage in public outreach but don’t know where to start? Already work with public-facing assignments and research but don’t know how that fits into public scholarship? The Public Scholarship Statement of Achievement series will introduce faculty to public-facing, multimodal assignments in the classroom and best practices for engaging with the public and promoting community engaged learning.

Fall 2020

  • What is Public Scholarship?: This first workshop introduces participants to a broad understanding of public scholarship and provides a space to discuss the potential for courses and projects.
  • Pedagogical Series
    • Enabling Students to be Public Scholars: Inspired by the work of Alexandria Lockett, this workshop introduces faculty to strategies that enable student writing in public spaces through hacker name, bio-mythography, and wiki editing activities.
    • Blogging in the Classroom: The blogging in the classroom workshop introduces participants to crafting and assessing public-facing writing assignments in the classroom.
    • Digital Storytelling: The Digital Storytelling workshop will cover basic tools and techniques for assigning multimodal narrative projects in the classroom.
    • Podcasting in the Classroom: Featuring David Morgen from Emory University, this workshop introduces participants to integrating podcasting activities and assessments in the classroom.
  • Organizing Flightless Conferences: This workshop introduces participants to different remote conferencing models and discusses best practices. Joshua King, conference organizer and Associate Professor at Baylor University, will join us to discuss past and future conferences.
  • Fall Public Scholarship Panel: The Public Scholarship series closes with a panel on engaging the public as a researcher. In this panel, Kayla Shipp, Digital Scholarship Specialist at the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship, and Peter Kindle, Professor of Social Work, will discuss their work with public-facing research and promoting the public good.

Spring 2021

  • Blogging in the Classroom: The blogging in the classroom workshop introduces participants to crafting and assessing public-facing writing assignments in the classroom.
  • Digital Storytelling: Featuring Danielle Loftus, the Digital Storytelling workshop will cover basic tools and techniques for assigning multimodal narrative projects in the classroom.
  • Podcasting in the Classroom: This workshop introduces participants to integrating podcasting activities and assessments in the classroom.
  • Community Engaged Learning: Join Kim Albracht from the Gallagher Center for Experiential Learning & Education Abroad to learn how you can integrate service learning into your classes. Meghann Jarchow, Chair of Sustainability and Environment, and Lindsey Jorgensen, Associate Professor of Communication Disorders, will share their successful uses of service learning in their classes.
  • Organizing Virtual Conferences: This workshop introduces participants to different remote conferencing models and discusses best practices.
  • Spring Public Scholarship Panel: The Public Scholarship series closes with a panel on engaging the public as a researcher. In this panel, Rachel Kolb, Junior Fellow at Harvard University, and Joe Kantenbacher, Assistant Professor of Sustainability and Environment, will discuss their work with public-facing research and promoting the public good.

Spring 2022

ORGANIZING VIRTUAL CONFERENCES PANEL

Organizing Virtual Conferences Panel flyer with image of virtual meeting on a laptop and the Public Scholarship logo.

Flightless and nearly carbon neutral conferencing is an emerging genre of research sharing focused on sustainability and the inclusion of researchers regardless of ability to travel. This workshop introduces participants to different virtual conferencing models and discusses best practices. Join us after the short workshop for a panel on virtual conference organization featuring April Carrillo, Angela Helmer, and Clayton Lehmann.

PUBLIC HUMANITIES LECTURE AND DISCUSSION

Join the Center for Teaching and Learning at the University of South Dakota for a two-part Zoom lecture and discussion with Josh Shepperd, assistant professor of media studies at the University of Colorado, director of the Library of Congress Sound Submissions Project, sound fellow of the Library of Congress National Recording Preservation Board, and associate editor of Resonance: The Journal of Sound and Culture. The first session, Building Public Humanities Projects with the Library of Congress, will focus on the process of developing public humanities projects from concept to materialization with attention to the theoretical underpinnings of the projects. The second session, Managing Public Humanities Projects with the Library of Congress, will emphasize the practical aspects of maintaining a project with tips on federal grant writing and working with DC institutions.

COMMUNITY ENGAGED LEARNING

Moving from a classroom-centered to a collaborative community-based learning structure can have significant long-term benefits for students. Unfortunately, community-based teaching and research can be unpredictable and potentially uncomfortable, making it inevitably challenging for both faculty and students. In this workshop, Kim Albracht of the Gallagher Center looks at best practices and model programs for moving toward a reflective pedagogy that is student-centered, community-based, and experiential. Participants can expect to gain knowledge of pedagogy, community partnerships, and reflection and assessment principles to aid with the use of service-learning interventions in their courses.

Fall 2022

Developing the Hugo Black Digital Library

Research Sharing

Conference Presentation

I explain more about the broad view of public scholarship the inspires this sequence in my talk at the Engaging Open Social Scholarship gathering organized by the Implementing New Knowledge Environments Partnership.

Publication

Enabling Public Scholars through Faculty Development. Pop! Public. Open. Participatory, issue no. 3, November 2021. https://popjournal.ca/issue03/adamson. 

Abstract

To support faculty as they remained civically engaged during the pandemic, the Center for Teaching and Learning at the University of South Dakota (CTL) launched a training series on public scholarship partnering with facilitators from Emory, Baylor, and Harvard. Core outcome of the series were for faculty to find a home for themselves in public engagement and to support students in their own public-facing work. The series introduced faculty to public scholarship as a dialogical partnership and offered workshops on facilitating public-facing student work and organizing virtual conferences, concluding each term with a panel featuring academics who promote the common good in different ways. This article explains the development of this series with the theoretical underpinnings that guided it and concludes by proposing a definition of public scholarship that includes student voices and repositions universities within the communities they inhabit.

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